Mount of Olives (crs)

Mount of Olives from excavations on the Temple Mount
Mount of Olives from excavations on the Temple Mount
Mount of Olives, across the Kidron Valley
From the Mount of Olives
Temple Mount
From the Mount of Olives
Temple Mount
Mount of Olives
Looking into the Kidron Valley
      
Mount of Olives
Dominus Flevit Chapel
Mount of Olives
Sarcophagi
Mount of Olives
Dominus Flavit Chapel
Mount of Olives
Dominus Flevit Chapel mosaics
Mount of Olives
Dominus Flevit Chapel
From the Mount of Olives
Dome of the Rock
      
Mount of Olives
Church of Mary Magdalene
Mount of Olives
Church of Mary Magdalene
Mount of Olives
Destroyed Jewish graveyard
Mount of Olives
Walking down the Mount
Mount of Olives
Walking down the Mount
Mount of Olives
Walking down the Mount
      
Mount of Olives
A caretaker
Mount of Olives
Garden of Gethsemane
Mount of Olives
Garden of Gethsemane
Mount of Olives
Chucrh of All Nations
Mount of Olives
Church of All Nations
Mount of Olives
Church of All Nations
      
Mount of Olives
Church of All Nations
Mount of Olives
Church of All Nations
Mount of Olives
Church of All Nations

 

Image/s: circa 2000, 2005  Accesses: 236

 

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The Mount of Olives is a mountain ridge reaching 2600 ft to the east of the Jerusalem.  It overlooks the Temple Mount and the Old City.  Frequently mentioned in the New Testament in conjunction with Jesus, the Garden of Gethsemane is on the lower slopes of the mountain.  Jews have been buried on the Mount of Olives for centuries. There are an estimated 150,000 graves.  Roman soldiers from the 10th Legion camped on the Mount during the Siege of Jerusalem in the year 70.  Jewish burials were halted in 1948, and massive vandalism took place from 1948-1967.  During the nineteen years of Jordanian rule, 40,000 of the 50,000 graves were desecrated.  King Hussein permitted the construction of the Intercontinental Hotel at the summit of the Mount of Olives together with a road that cut through the cemetery which destroyed hundreds of Jewish graves, some from the First Temple Period.  After the Six-Day War the cemetery was re-opened.

Reference/s: Wikipedia

Identifier: 45, Last Accessed: 2017-07-25 10:59:18

 

Copyright: © A. O. Newberry & Co. 2007-2017
All rights reserved.

Last Modified: Fri Jul 29 2016 09:10:20.

 

 



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