Pantheon (crs)

Piazza della Rotonda
Piazza della Rotonda
Pantheon, from Piazza della Rotonda
Pantheon, from Piazza della Rotonda
Pantheon, from Piazza della Rotonda
Pantheon, from Via della Rotonda
Pantheon
Portico Detail
      
Pantheon
Portico Detail
Pantheon
Portico Detail
Pantheon
Portico Detail
Pantheon
Portico Detail
Pantheon
Portico Detail
Pantheon
Portico Detail
      
Pantheon
Pantheon
Pantheon
Pantheon
Portico Detail
Pantheon
Main Entrance
Pantheon, Inside
Pantheon, Inside
      
Pantheon
Pantheon
Pantheon
Exterior Detail
Pantheon
Exterior Detail
Pantheon
Exterior Detail
Pantheon
Exterior Detail
      
Pantheon
Exterior Detail
Pantheon, Along the Via della Palombella
Exterior Detail
Pantheon
Exterior Detail
Pantheon, from Via della Rotonda
Exterior Detail
Pantheon, from Via della Rotonda
Exterior Detail
Pantheon, from Via della Rotonda
Exterior Detail
      
Pantheon, from Via della Rotonda
Exterior Detail
Pantheon
Exterior Detail
Pantheon
Exterior Detail
Pantheon, along Via della Rotonda
Exterior Detail
Pantheon, along Via della Palombella
Exterior Detail
Pantheon, along Via della Palombella
Exterior Detail
      
Pantheon, along Via della Palombella
Exterior Detail
Pantheon, along Via della Palombella
Exterior Detail
Pantheon, along Via della Palombella
Exterior Detail
Pantheon, along Via della Palombella
Exterior Detail
Pantheon, along Via della Palombella
Exterior Detail
Pantheon, along Via della Palombella
Exterior Detail
      
Pantheon, along Via della Minerva
Exterior Detail
Pantheon, along Via della Minerva
Exterior Detail
Pantheon, along Via della Minerva
Exterior Detail
Pantheon, along Via della Minerva
Exterior Detail
Pantheon, along Via della Minerva
Exterior Detail
Pantheon, along Via della Minerva
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Pantheon, along Via della Minerva
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Pantheon, along Via della Minerva
Exterior Detail
Pantheon, along Via della Minerva
Exterior Detail

 

Item: circa 126  Image/s: circa 1999, 2003, 2004, 2005  Accesses: 215

 

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In the aftermath of the Battle of Actium, Marcus Agrippa built the original Pantheon in 27 BC.  The form of Agrippa's Pantheon is debated.  The Pantheon was destroyed along with other buildings in a huge fire in 80.  Domitian rebuilt the Pantheon, which burned again in 110.  The design of the building might belong to Trajan's architect Apollodorus of Damascus.  It was finished by Hadrian but not claimed as one of his works.  The degree to which the decorative scheme should be credited to Hadrian's architects is uncertain.  The text of the inscription translates to "'Marcus Agrippa, son of Lucius, Consul for the third time, built this".  The building was repaired by Septimius Severus and Caracalla in 202.  In 609, the Byzantine emperor Phocas gave the building to Pope Boniface IV, who converted it into a Christian church and consecrated it to Santa Maria dei Martiri.  The building's consecration as a church saved it from the abandonment, destruction, and the worst of the spoliation.  Much fine external marble has been removed over the centuries, and there are capitals from some of the pilasters in the British Museum.  Two columns were swallowed up in the medieval buildings that abutted the Pantheon on the east and were lost.  Another other loss has been the external sculptures, which adorned the pediment above Agrippa's inscription.  The marble interior has largely survived, although with extensive restoration.  Since the Renaissance the Pantheon has been used as a tomb.  Among those buried there are the painters Raphael and Annibale Carracci, the composer Arcangelo Corelli, and the architect Baldassare Peruzzi.  In the 15th century, the Pantheon was adorned with paintings: the best-known is the Annunciation by Melozzo da Forlì.  Architects, like Brunelleschi, who used the Pantheon as help when designing the Cathedral of Florence's dome, looked to the Pantheon as inspiration for their works.  Pope Urban VIII (1623 to 1644) ordered the bronze ceiling of the Pantheon's portico melted down.  Most of the bronze was used to make bombards for the fortification of Castel Sant'Angelo.  It is also said that some of the bronze was used by Bernini in creating his famous baldachin above the high altar of St. Peter's Basilica, but according to at least one expert, the Pope's accounts state that about 90% of the bronze was used for the cannon, and that the bronze for the baldachin came from Venice.  Also buried there are two kings of Italy: Vittorio Emanuele II and Umberto I, as well as Umberto's Queen, Margherita.  The Pantheon is still used as a church.  Masses are celebrated there, particularly on important Catholic days of obligation, and weddings.

This is one of my favorite buildings.

Reference/s: Wikipedia

Identifier: 448, Last Accessed: 2017-07-25 11:31:08

 

Copyright: © A. O. Newberry & Co. 2007-2017
All rights reserved.

Last Modified: Fri Jul 29 2016 09:10:20.

 

 



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