Siena (crs)

Siena
Medici Fortress Walls
Siena, Viale Vittorio Veneto
Public Gardens
Siena
Medici Fortress Walls
Siena
Cateriniana San Domenico
Siena, Tower of Mangia
Overview
Siena
Cateriniana San Domenico
      
Siena
Cateriniana San Domenico
Siena
Cateriniana San Domenico
Via del Paradiso and Via della Sapienza
Siena
Siena
Tower of Mangia
Siena
Siena Cathedral
      
Siena
Siena Cathedral
Siena
Siena
Siena
Via delle Terme?
Siena
Siena
      
Siena
Siena
Siena
Siena Cathedral
Siena
Baptistry of St. John
Siena
Baptistry of St. John
Siena
Baptistry of St. John
      
Siena
Via Franciosa
Siena
Siena
Siena Cathedral
Siena
Siena Cathedral
Siena
Siena Cathedral
Siena
Siena Cathedral
      
Siena, Main Door
Siena Cathedral
Siena, Coronation of the Virgin
Siena Cathedral
Siena
Siena Cathedral
Siena
Siena Cathedral
Siena
Siena Cathedral
Siena
Siena Cathedral, Inside
      
Siena
Siena Cathedral, Inside
Siena
Siena Cathedral, Inside
Siena
Siena Cathedral, Inside
Siena
Siena Cathedral, Inside
Siena
Siena Cathedral, Inside
Siena, She Wolf of Siena
Piazza del Duomo
      
Siena
Episcopal Palace
Museo dell'Opera metropolitana del Duomo
Siena, Incomplete Enlargement
Siena Cathedral
Siena
Siena
Piazza San Giovanni
Siena
Piazza del Campo
      
Siena
Piazza del Campo
Piazza del Campo
Pubblico Palace
Siena
Archeologico Nazionale di Siena
Clock
Siena
Siena Cathedral

 

Image/s: circa 2003  Accesses: 258

 

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Siena was first settled in the time of the Etruscans (900 BC to 400 BC) when it was inhabited by a tribe called the Saina.  At the time of the Emperor Augustus, a Roman town called Saena Julia was founded on the site.  The first document mentioning it dates from 70.  According to legend, Siena was founded by Senius, son of Remus, who was in turn the brother of Romulus.  Siena did not prosper under Roman rule.  It was not situated near any major roads.  Christianity did not penetrate the city until the 4th century, and it was not until the Lombards invaded Siena and the surrounding territory that it knew prosperity.  The roads between the Lombards' northern possessions and Rome were re-routed through Siena.  Siena prospered as a trading post, and the constant streams of pilgrims passing to and from Rome were to prove a valuable source of income in the centuries to come.  Siena become a major center of money lending and an important player in the wool trade.  It was governed at first directly by its bishop, but episcopal power declined during the 1100s.  Siena declared its independence from episcopal control in 1167.  By 1179, it had a written constitution. During the early 12th century the majority of the construction of the Siena Cathedral was completed.  The facade was completed in 1380.  It was also during this period that the Piazza del Campo grew in importance as the center of secular life.  In the early 12th century a self-governing commune replaced the aristocratic government.  Siena's great rival was Florence.  On September 4, 1260 the Sienese supported by the forces of King Manfred of Sicily, defeated the Florentine Guelphs in the Battle of Montaperti.  The limits on the Roman town, were the earliest known walls to the city.  During the 10th and 11th centuries, the town grew to the east and later to the north.  New walls were built to totally surround the city, and a second set was finished by the end of the 13th century.  Siena's university, founded in 1240, is still among the most important Italian universities.  Siena was devastated by the Black Death of 1348.  Emperor Charles V put a Spanish garrison in Siena.  The citizens expelled it in 1552, allying with France.  Charles sent his general Gian Giacomo Medici to lay siege to it with a Florentine-Imperial army.  The Sienese were defeated at the Battle of Marciano in August 1554.  It surrendered to Florence on April 17, 1555 ending the Republic of Siena.  The Spanish King Philip, owing huge sums to the Medici, ceded it to the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, to which it belonged until the unification of Italy in the 19th century.

This was a "its Tuesday, I must be Belgium" type stop, just an afternoon walking through the city. My impression is that it deserves much more.

Reference/s: Wikipedia

Identifier: 409, Last Accessed: 2017-07-25 11:28:58

 

Copyright: © A. O. Newberry & Co. 2007-2017
All rights reserved.

Last Modified: Fri Jul 29 2016 09:10:20.

 

 



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