Pisa (cmrs)

Pisa
Baptistry, Cathedral and Tower
Pisa
New City Walls
Pisa
New City Walls
Pisa
Piazza del Miracoli
Entrance to the Piazza dei Miracoli
Piazza del Miracoli
Piza
Piazza del Miracoli
      
Piza
Piazza del Miracoli
Piza
Piazza del Miracoli
Piza
Bell Tower of the Cathedral
Piza
Bell Tower of the Cathedral
Piza
Bell Tower of the Cathedral
Piza
Bell Tower of the Cathedral
      
Piza
Bell Tower of the Cathedral
Piza
Bell Tower of the Cathedral
Piza
Holding the Tower Up
Piza
Some Things Never Change
Piza
Baptistry and Cathedral
Piza
New City Walls
      
Piza
New City Walls
Piza
New City Walls
Piza
New City Walls
Piza
Piazza del Miracoli
Piza
Campo Santo
Piza
Campo Santo
      
Piza
Piazza del Miracoli
Piza
Fountain of Putti
Piza
In the Town
Piza
Palace of the Archbishop
Piza
Piza
Piza
Palace of the Archbishop
      
Piza
Moses by Andrea Vaccá
Piza
In the Town
Piza
In the Town
Piza
In the Town
Piza
In the Town
Baptistery of St. John (Battistero di San Giovanni)
Baptistery of St. John
      
Cathedral of St. Mary of the Assumption
Duomo of Pisa

 

Image/s: circa 2003  Accesses: 285

 

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Archeological remains from the 5th century BC confirm the existence of a seaport trading with Greeks and Gauls.  In 180 BC, it became a Roman colony and in 89 BC a municipium.  From the 9th century Saracen pirates forced the city to expand its fleet.  In 828 Pisan ships assaulted the coast of North Africa.  In 871 they took part in the defense of Salerno against the Saracens.  In 1017 Pisa captured Sardinia by defeating the Saracen king Mugahid.  Between 1030 and 1035, Pisa successfully defeated several rival towns in Sicily and conquer Carthage in North Africa.  In 1051–1052 they conquered Corsica.  In 1063 they took Palermo from the Saracen pirates.  The gold treasure taken from the Saracens in Palermo allowed the Pisans to start building the cathedral in the Piazza dei Miracoli.  In 1092 Pope Urban II awarded Pisa control of Corsica and Sardinia.  Pisa sacked the Tunisian city of Mahdia in 1088.  A Pisan fleet of 120 ships also took part in the First Crusade and the Pisans were instrumental in the taking of Jerusalem in 1099.  Pisa took advantage of the crusade to establish trading posts and colonies in Syria, Lebanon and Palestine.  The war between Pisa and Genoa lasting from 1119 to 1133 started when the Genoese attacked several Pisan galleys.  Amalfi was conquered in 1136 bringing Pisa to the peak of its power.  In 1181 Pisa and Genoa signed a peace treaty which was violated in 1199 when the Pisans blockaded the port of Brindisi.  In the ensuing naval battle they were defeated by the Venetians.  The decline began in 1284 when their numerically superior fleet was defeated by the brilliant tactics of the Genoese in the naval Battle of Meloria.  Pisa never fully recovered.  In 1290 the Genoese destroyed Pisa's port.  Goods continued to be traded, but in reduced quantity.  Finally the Arno started to change course, preventing galleys from reaching the city's river port.  Pisa tried to regain its power in the course of the 14th century and even managed to defeat Florence in 1315 but was conquered by Florence in 1406.  In the 15th century, access to the sea became difficult and its role as the major port of Tuscany went to Livorno.  Pisa's population has remained almost constant since the Middle Ages.  In my estimation, Pisa has much more to offer than the leaning tower.

Reference/s: Wikipedia

Identifier: 405, Last Accessed: 2017-09-19 17:40:12

 

Copyright: © A. O. Newberry & Co. 2007-2017
All rights reserved.

Last Modified: Fri Jul 29 2016 09:10:20.

 

 



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