Padua (crs)

Padua
Piazza Prato della Valle
Padua
Piazza Prato della Valle
Padua
Piazza Prato della Valle
Padua
Piazza Prato della Valle
Padua
Piazza Prato della Valle
Padua
Piazza Prato della Valle
      
Padua
Piazza Prato della Valle
Padua
Piazza Prato della Valle
Padua
Padua
Padua
Abbazia di Santa Giustina
Padua
Abbazia di Santa Giustina
      
Padua
Abbazia di Santa Giustina
Padua
Abbazia di Santa Giustina
Padua
Abbazia di Santa Giustina
Padua
Abbazia di Santa Giustina
Padua
Abbazia di Santa Giustina
Padua
Abbazia di Santa Giustina
      
Padua
Our Trusty Steed
Basilica of St. Anthony
Basilica of St. Anthony
Padua
Cappella degli Scrovegni

 

Image/s: circa 2003  Accesses: 225

 

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Padua was founded in 1183 BC by the Trojan prince Antenor.  The city was a Roman municipium in 45 BC.  Padua was invaded by Attila the Hun in 452.  It passed to the Gothic kings Odoacer and Theodoric the Great.  The city was seized by the Goths under Totila, but was restored to the Eastern Empire by Narses in 568.  Then it fell under the control of the Lombards.  In 601, the city rose in revolt, against Agilulf, the Lombard king.  After suffering a 12 year long bloody siege, it was stormed and burned.  Padua was still weak when the Franks succeeded the Lombards.  The main event of the High Middle Ages was the sack of the city by the Magyars in 899.  At the beginning of the 11th century the citizens established a constitution.  The university was founded in 1222.  In 1236 Frederick II established his tyrannical vicar, Ezzelino da Romano, in Padua and the neighboring cities.  Ezzelino was unseated in 1256.  The basilica of Saint Anthony was begun in 1282.  Padua passed to Venetian rule in 1405, and remained so, except for a brief period in 1509, until the fall of the Venetian Republic.  In 1797 the Venetian Republic was dissolved and Padua was ceded to the Austrian Empire.  After the fall of Napoleon, in 1815, the city became part of the Kingdom of Lombardy-Venetia.  In 1866, Padua and the rest of the Veneto were annexed to Kingdom of Italy.  When Italy entered World War I in 1915, Padua was chosen as the main command point of the Italian Army.  The king, Victor Emanuel III, and the commander in chief Cadorna went to live in Padua.  Following Italy's World War II defeat in 1943, Padua became part of the Italian Social Republic (the Nazi puppet state).  The city was finally liberated by partisans and New Zealand troops on April 28, 1945.

Reference/s: Wikipedia

Identifier: 404, Last Accessed: 2017-09-24 21:04:08

 

Copyright: © A. O. Newberry & Co. 2007-2017
All rights reserved.

Last Modified: Fri Jul 29 2016 09:10:20.

 

 



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