Bologna (crs)

Bologna
Bologna
Toward the City Center
Bologna
Toward the City Center
Bologna
Toward the City Center
Bologna
Toward the City Center
Bologna
Piazza del Nettuno
      
Bologna
Piazza del Nettuno
Bologna
Fontana del Nettuno
Bologna
Fontana del Nettuno
Bologna
Neptune by Giambologna
Bologna
Fontana del Nettuno
Bologna
Fontana del Nettuno
      
Bologna
Fontana del Nettuno
Bologna
Fontana del Nettuno
Bologna
Fontana del Nettuno
Bologna
Fontana del Nettuno
Bologna
Palazzo Re Enzo
Bologna
Palazzo Re Enzo
      
Bologna
Bologna
Bologna
Cathedral, Palazzo dei Notai
Bologna
Bologna, Italians dying for Bologna
Palazzo D'Accursio
Bologna, Piazza Maggiore
Palazzo Re Enzo
      
Bologna
Piazza Maggiore
Bologna
Palazzo Re Enzo
Bologna, Piazza Maggiore
Palazzo Re Enzo
Bologna, Piazza Maggiore
Palazzo D'Accursio
Bologna, Palazzo D'Accursio
Piazza Maggiore
Bologna
Palazzo D'Accursio
      
Bologna
Palazzo D'Accursio
Bologna
Palazzo D'Accursio
Bologna
Piazza Maggiore
Bologna
Bologna
Bologna
      
Bologna
Bologna
Bologna
Piazza Maggiore
Bologna
Bologna
Bologna
      
Bologna
Bologna
Bologna
Bologna
Bologna
Bologna
Basilica di San Petronio
      
Bologna
Street Market

 

Image/s: circa 2003  Accesses: 285

 

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In the 4th century BC, the city and the surrounding area were conquered by the Boii, a Celtic tribe coming from Transalpine Gaul.  The Romans founded of the colony of Bononia in c.189 BC.  The building of the Via Aemilia, a major Roman road, in 187 BC made Bologna an important center.  Although fire damaged the city during the reign of Claudius, Nero rebuilt it in the 1st century.  After a long decline, Bologna was reborn in the 5th century under bishop Petronius.  After the fall of Rome, Bologna was a frontier stronghold of the Exarchate of Ravenna.  In 728, the city became part of the Lombard Kingdom.  In 1088, the Studio was founded, now the oldest university in Europe.  In 1256, Bologna promulgated the Legge del Paradiso ("Paradise Law"), which abolished feudal serfdom and freed the slaves.  After being crushed in the Battle of Zappolino 1325, Bologna began to decay and asked the protection of the Pope at the beginning of the 14th century.  In 1348, during the Black Plague, about 30,000 inhabitants died.  In the middle of the 15th century, the Bentivoglio family gained control of Bologna.  During the Renaissance, Bologna was the only Italian city that allowed women to excel in any profession.  Giovanni Bentivoglio's reign ended in 1506 when the Papal troops of Julius II besieged Bologna and sacked his palace.  From that point on, until the 18th century, Bologna was a Papal State.  In 1530, in front of Saint Petronio Church, Charles V was crowned Holy Roman Emperor by Pope Clement VII.  In 1564, the Piazza del Nettuno and the Palazzo dei Banchi were built, along with the Archiginnasio, the seat of the University.  After the fall of Napoleon, Bologna was returned to Papal control, rebelling in 1831 and again 1849.  After a visit by Pope Pius IX in 1857, the city voted for annexation to the Kingdom of Sardinia on June 12, 1859, becoming part of the united Italy.  At the beginning of the 20th century the walls were destroyed in order to build new houses.  During World War II, Bologna was a key transportation hub for the Germans.  Its capture by Polish infantry on April 21, 1945 led to the liberation of the Po Valley and the collapse of German defenses in northern Italy.

Reference/s: Wikipedia

Identifier: 395, Last Accessed: 2017-11-16 02:53:40

 

Copyright: © A. O. Newberry & Co. 2007-2017
All rights reserved.

Last Modified: Fri Jul 29 2016 09:10:20.

 

 



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