Ariccia (crs)

Ariccia
Ariccia
Santa Maria Assunta
Ariccia
Santa Maria Assunta
Ariccia
Piazza della Republica
Ariccia
Piazza della Republica
Ariccia
Piazza della Republica
      
Ariccia
Piazza della Republica
Ariccia
Piazza della Republica
Ariccia
Santa Maria Assunta
Ariccia
Santa Maria Assunta
Ariccia
Santa Maria Assunta
Ariccia
Santa Maria Assunta
      
Ariccia
Santa Maria Assunta
Ariccia
Santa Maria Assunta
Ariccia
Santa Maria Assunta
Ariccia
Santa Maria Assunta
Ariccia
Santa Maria Assunta
Ariccia
Santa Maria Assunta
      
Ariccia
Via dell'Uccelliera
Ariccia
Ariccia
Ariccia, Statue of Flora
Church of St. Nicholas
Ariccia
Statue of Flora
Ariccia
      
Ariccia
Corso Giuseppe Garibaldi
Ariccia
Ariccia
Ariccia
Ariccia
City Wall
Ariccia
Porta Romana
      
Ariccia
Porta Romana
Ariccia
From Porta Romana
Ariccia
From Porta Romana
Ariccia
Porta Romana
Ariccia
Ariccia
Th Grand Bridge
      
Ariccia
Ariccia
Ariccia
Ariccia
Ariccia
Ariccia
      
Ariccia
Ariccia
Ariccia
Ariccia
Traveling Companion
Ariccia
Palazzo Chigi
Palazzo Chigi
      

 

Image/s: circa 2003  Accesses: 272

 

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Ruins found in the city confirm the existence of a settlement from the 8th-9th centuries BC.  From the end of the 6th century BC until 338 BC, the city was the central member of the Latin League.  Association with the cult of Diana led to its development as an influential center of healing and medicine.  Ariccia was conquered by the Romans in the 4th century BC.  It received the title of municipium, and expanded towards the valley below, where the Via Appia connected it with Rome.  Ariccia became the first main posting station on the overland journey from Rome towards southern Italy.  Being rather near to the Imperial capital, and favored by a fresher climate, Ariccia was chosen by many of the Rome's patricians as a location for their leisure villas.  Because of its wealth and its location near the coast, the city was sacked several times during and after the fall of the Roman Empire, by Goths, Vandals and Saracens who destroyed it in 827.  During the reign of Pope Nicholas II Ariccia was absorbed by the Papal States, and in turn passed in 1116 to the Earls of Tusculum as a fiefdom.  The Roman Church regained Ariccia in 1223 and maintained it until the first half of the 15th century.  Pope Sixtus IV handed Ariccia over to the Savelli family.  In 1661 the city passed to the Chigi family, who built the Palazzo Savelli Chigi in the main square.  In 1854 Pope Pius IX ordered the construction of a bridge.  This bridge bypassed the valley, which hindered access to Ariccia from Rome along the Via Appia.  The bridge was destroyed by retreating German troops during World War II.  Rebuilt in 1947, it crumbled in 1967 and was rebuilt again.

Reference/s: Wikipedia

Identifier: 393, Last Accessed: 2017-09-20 18:36:22

 

Copyright: © A. O. Newberry & Co. 2007-2017
All rights reserved.

Last Modified: Fri Jul 29 2016 09:10:20.

 

 



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