Ile de la Cité (crs)

Ile de la Cité
La Tour de L'Horloge
Ile de la Cité
La Tour de L'Horloge
Ile de la Cité
The Clock
Ile de la Cité
Ile de la Cité
Ile de la Cité
Conciergerie
      
Ile de la Cite
Sainte-Chapelle
Ile de la Cite
Rue Lutece
Ile de la Cité
Quai de la Corse
Ile de la Cité
Marché aux Fleurs
Ile de la Cité
Boat Rides by Pont Neuf
Ile de la Cité
Boat Rides by Pont Neuf
      
Ile de la Cité
Boat Rides by Pont Neuf
Ile de la Cité
Boat Rides by Pont Neuf
Ile de la Cité
River Access
Ile de la Cité
Pont Neuf
Ile de la Cité
Pont Neuf
Ile de la Cité
Pont Neuf
      
Ile de la Cité
Pont Neuf
Ile de la Cité
Notre-Dame
Ile de la Cité
WWII Monument
Ile de la Cité
WWII Monument
Ile de la Cité
WWII Monument
Ile de la Cité
WWII Monument
      
Ile de la Cité
Square du Vert Galant
Ile de la Cité
Traveling Companions
Ile de la Cité
Ile de la Cite
Notre-Dame de Paris
Ile de la Cité
Sainte-Chapelle

 

Image/s: circa 1998 - 2006  Accesses: 194

 

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In 52 BC, after the conquest of the Celts, the Roman Labienus created a temporary camp on the island.  Romans under Saint Genevieve escaped to the island when attacked by Huns.  Clovis established a Merovingian palace on the island, which became the capital of Merovingian Neustria.  This palace later became the Le Palais de la Cite.  The island remained an important military and political center throughout the Middle Ages.  Eudes used the island as a defensive position to fend off Viking attacks in 885, and in the 10th century, a cathedral (the predecessor of Notre-Dame, St Etienne) was built on the island.  Wooden bridges linked the island to the riverbanks on either side, the Grand Pont (the Pont au Change) spanning the wider reach to the Right Bank, and the Petit Pont spanning the narrower crossing to the Left Bank.  The first stone bridge was built in 1378 at the site of the present Pont Saint-Michel, but ice floes carried it away along with the houses that had been built on it in 1408.  The Grand Pont or Pont Notre-Dame, also swept away at intervals by floodwaters, and the Petit Pont were rebuilt by Fra Giovanni Giocondo at the beginning of the 16th century.  The Île de la Cité remains the heart of Paris.  All road distances in France are calculated from the "zero kilometer" point located in the Place du Parvis de Notre-Dame, the square fin front of Notre-Dame de Paris.  The former Le Palais de la Cite, no longer inhabited by kings since the mid-14th century, consisted of a diverse set of heterogeneous buildings repeatedly burned, rebuilt and expanded.  Several old structures remain on the island including Notre Dame de Paris(1163), Conciergerie(part of Le Palais de la Cite), Pont Neuf(1578), Sainte-Chapelle(1245) and La Tour de L'Horloge(~1370).

Reference/s: Wikipedia

Identifier: 223, Last Accessed: 2017-09-20 12:38:10

 

Copyright: © A. O. Newberry & Co. 2007-2017
All rights reserved.

Last Modified: Fri Jul 29 2016 09:10:20.

 

 



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