Novodevichy Convent (cmrs)

Novodevichy Convent
UNESCO Plaque
Novodevichy Convent
Convent Layout
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Cathedral, Virgin of Smolensk
      
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Bell Tower
Novodevichy Convent
Bell Tower
Novodevichy Convent
Wall and Watch Tower
Novodevichy Convent
Gate Church, Transfiguration
Novodevichy Convent
Gate Church, Transfiguration
      
Novodevichy Convent
Gate Church, Transfiguration
Novodevichy Convent
Gate Church, Transfiguration
Novodevichy Convent
Cathedral, Virgin of Smolensk
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Lopukhin Palace
Novodevichy Convent
Lopukhin Palace
      
Novodevichy Convent
Lopukhin Palace
Novodevichy Convent
Lopukhin Palace
Novodevichy Convent
Lopukhin Palace
Novodevichy Convent
Graves within the Walls
Novodevichy Convent
Graves within the Walls
Novodevichy Convent
Graves within the Walls
      
Novodevichy Convent
Graves within the Walls
Novodevichy Convent
Graves within the Walls
Novodevichy Convent
Graves within the Walls
Novodevichy Convent
Graves within the Walls
Novodevichy Convent
Graves within the Walls
Novodevichy Convent
Graves within the Walls
      
Novodevichy Convent
Graves within the Walls
Novodevichy Convent
Graves within the Walls
Novodevichy Convent
Graves within the Walls
Novodevichy Convent
Graves within the Walls
Novodevichy Convent
Graves within the Walls
Novodevichy Convent
Graves within the Walls
      
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Church of the Assumption
Novodevichy Convent
Church of the Assumption
Novodevichy Convent
Church of the Assumption
Novodevichy Convent
Church of the Assumption
      
Novodevichy Convent
Refectory
Novodevichy Convent
Church of the Assumption
Novodevichy Convent
Refectory
Novodevichy Convent
Refectory
Novodevichy Convent
Cathedral, Virgin of Smolensk
Novodevichy Convent
      
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Cathedral, Virgin of Smolensk
Novodevichy Convent
Gate Church, Intercession
Novodevichy Convent
Gate Church, Intercession
Novodevichy Convent, Vorobeva Tower
Maria's Chambers
Novodevichy Convent
Maria's Chambers
      
Novodevichy Convent, Vorobeva Tower, Shoemaker's Tower
Maria's Chambers
Novodevichy Convent
Church of St. Ambrose
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Setunskaya Tower
Novodevichy Convent
Setunskaya Tower
Novodevichy Convent
Faceted Tower
      
Novodevichy Convent
Faceted Tower
Novodevichy Convent
Graves within the Walls
Novodevichy Convent
Graves within the Walls
Novodevichy Convent
Graves within the Walls
Novodevichy Convent
Graves within the Walls
Novodevichy Convent
      
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Palace of Irina Gudunova
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Palace of Irina Gudunova
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
      
Novodevichy Convent
Filatyev School
Novodevichy Convent
Novodevichy Convent
Nuns' Cells
Novodevichy Convent
Hospital
Novodevichy Convent
Hospital
Novodevichy Convent
Cathedral, Virgin of Smolensk
      

 

Novodevichy Convent (AKA: Novodevichiy Convent)

Item: circa 16th and 17th Centuries  Image/s: circa 2006  Accesses: 466

 

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Novodevichy Convent is probably the best-known cloister of Moscow.  Unlike other Moscow cloisters, it has remained virtually intact since the 17th century.  The Novodevichy Convent was founded in 1524 by Grand Prince Vasili III in commemoration of the conquest of Smolensk in 1514.  It was built as a fortress at a curve of the Moskva River and became an important part of the southern defensive belt of the capital.  The Novodevichy Convent was known to have sheltered many ladies from the Russian royal families and boyar clans, who had been forced to take the veil.  In 1610–1611, the Novodevichy Convent was captured by the Polish.  In 1724, the monastery housed a military hospital for the soldiers and officers of the Russian army and an orphanage for female foundlings.  By 1763, the convent housed 84 nuns, 35 lay sisters, and 78 sick patients and servants.  Each year, the state provided the Novodevichy Convent with food and money.  In 1812, Napoleon's army made an attempt to blow up the convent, but the nuns managed to save it from destruction.  In 1871, the Filatyev brothers donated money for a shelter-school for orphans of "ignoble origins".  In early 1900s, the Cathedral was surveyed and restored by architect and preservationist Ivan Mashkov.  In 1917, there were 51 nuns and 53 lay sisters in the Novodevichy Convent.  In 1922, the Bolsheviks closed down the convent and turned it into the Museum of Women's Emancipation.  By 1926, the monastery had been transformed into a history and art museum.  In 1934, it became affiliated with the State Historical Museum.  In 1945, the Soviets returned Assumption Cathedral to the believers.  Some of the churches and other monastic buildings are still affiliated with the State Historical Museum.  In 1995, they resumed service in the convent on patron saint's days.

Reference/s: Wikipedia
 UNESCO

Identifier: 177, Last Accessed: 2017-11-18 12:22:27

 

Copyright: © A. O. Newberry & Co. 2007-2017
All rights reserved.

Last Modified: Fri Jul 29 2016 09:10:20.

 

 



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