Kremlin (cmrs)

Kremlin, Senate Tower, Lenin's Mausoleum
Kremlin Wall
Kremlin,Tsar's Tower, Spasskaya Tower
Kremlin Wall
Kremlin, Tsar's Tower, Tocsin Tower
Kremlin Wall
Kremlin, Tsar's Tower
Kremlin Wall
Kremlin, From Bolshoy Kamennyy Most
Kremlin, Nikolskaya Tower
Kremlin Wall
      
Kremlin, Trinity Tower
Katufya Tower, Entrance
Kremlin, Troitskiy Bridge
Katufya Tower
Kremlin
Kremlin
Toward Borovitskaya Tower
Kremlin
Toward Borovitskaya Tower
Kremlin
Toward Borovitskaya Tower
      
Kremlin
Borovitskaya Tower
Kremlin
Borovitskaya Tower
Kremlin, State Armory
Borovitskaya Tower
Kremlin
Borovitskaya Tower
Kremlin
State Armory
Kremlin
State Armory
      
Kremlin
State Armory
Kremlin
State Armory
Kremlin, Great Kremlin Palace
State Armory
Kremlin, Cathedral of the Annunciation
Great Kremlin Palace
Kremlin
Great Kremlin Palace
Kremlin
Great Kremlin Palace
      
Kremlin
Great Kremlin Palace
Kremlin
Toward the Moscow River
Kremlin, Cathedral of the Archangel
Cathedral of the Annunciation
Kremlin
Taynitskaya Tower
Kremlin, Great Kermlin Palace
Cathedral of the Annunciation
Kremlin, Church of the Disposition of the Robe
Cathedral of the Assumption
      
Church of the Twelve Apostles
Cathedral Square
Cathedral of the Archangel Michael
Cathedral of the Archangel
Kremlin
Cathedral of the Assumption
Kremlin
Tsar Bell
Kremlin
Tsar Bell
Kremlin
Tsar Bell
      
Kremlin
Tsar Bell
Kremlin
Tsar Cannon
Kremlin
Tsar Cannon
Kremlin
Tsar Cannon
Kremlin
Tsar Cannon
Kremlin
Tsar Cannon
      
Kremlin
Tsar Cannon
Kremlin
Tsar Cannon
Kremlin, President's Residence
Tsar Cannon
Kremlin, Supreme Soviet
President's Residence
Kremlin, AKA: State Kremiln Palace
Palace of the Congress
Kremlin
Church of the Twelve Apostles
      
Kremlin, Trinity Tower
Palace of the Congress
Kremlin
Arsenal
Kremlin
Palace of the Congress
Kremlin
Arsenal
Kremlin
Nikolskaya Tower
Kremlin
Arsenal
      
Kremlin
Arsenal
Kremlin
Arsenal
Kremlin
Trinity Tower
Kremlin
Kremlin
Kremlin, 2<sup>nd</sup> & 1<sup>st</sup> Arsenal Towers
      
Kremlin
Kremlin

 

Image/s: circa 2006  Accesses: 370

 

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The site of the Kremlin has been continuously inhabited since the 2nd millennium BC.  The Slavs occupied the south-western portion of the hill as early as the 11th century.  Until the 14th century, the site was known as the grad of Moscow.  The word "kremlin" was first recorded in 1331.  The "grad" was greatly extended by Prince Yuri Dolgoruky in 1156, destroyed by the Mongols in 1237 and rebuilt in oak in 1339.  The first recorded stone structures in the Kremlin were built in the late 1320s and early 1330s.  Dmitri Donskoi replaced the oaken walls with a strong citadel of white limestone in 1366–1368 on the basic foundations of the current walls.  Dmitri's son Vasily I initiated construction of churches and cloisters in the Kremlin.  The newly-built Annunciation Cathedral was painted by Theophanes the Greek, Andrey Rublev, and Prokhor in 1405.  The Chudov Monastery was founded by Dmitri's tutor, Metropolitan Alexis; while his widow, Eudoxia, established the Ascension Convent in 1397.  During Grand Prince Ivan III's reign the three existing cathedrals of the Kremlin, the Deposition Church, and the Palace of Facets were constructed.  The highest building of the city and Muscovite Russia was the Ivan the Great Bell Tower, built in 1505–08 and augmented to its present height in 1600.  The Kremlin walls as they now appear were built between 1485 and 1495.  The Kremlin was separated from the walled merchant town (Kitai-gorod) by a 30-metre-wide moat.  During the Time of Troubles, the Kremlin was held by the Polish forces for two years, between September 21, 1610 and October 26, 1612.  The Kremlin's liberation by the volunteer army of Kuzma Minin and Dmitry Pozharsky paved the way for the election of Mikhail Romanov as the new tsar.  During his reign and that of his son Alexis, the eleven-domed Upper Saviour Cathedral, Armorial Gate, Terem Palace, Amusement Palace and the palace of Patriarch Nikon were built.  Later, Peter abandoned the residence of his forefathers for his new capital, Saint Petersburg.  Although still used for coronation ceremonies, the Kremlin was abandoned and neglected until 1773, when Catherine the Great decided to build her new residence there.  Following Napoleon's invasion of Russia in 1812, the French forces occupied the Kremlin from September 2 to October 11.  When Napoleon fled Moscow, he ordered the whole Kremlin to be blown up.  The Kremlin Arsenal, several portions of the Kremlin Wall and several wall towers were destroyed by explosions and fires damaged the Faceted Chamber and churches.  On visiting Moscow for his coronation festivities, Nicholas I was not satisfied with the Grand, or Winter, Palaces.  The architect Konstantin Thon was commissioned to construct Grand Kremlin Palace.  The palace was constructed in 1839–49, followed by the new building of the Kremlin Armory in 1851.  After 1851, the Kremlin changed little until the Russian Revolution of 1917.  The Soviet government moved from Petrograd to Moscow on March 12, 1918.  The residence of the Soviet government was closed to tourists until 1955.  It was not until the Khrushchev Thaw that the Kremlin was reopened to foreign visitors.  The Kremlin Museums were established in 1961.

Reference/s: Wikipedia

Identifier: 174, Last Accessed: 2017-07-25 11:41:03

 

Copyright: © A. O. Newberry & Co. 2007-2017
All rights reserved.

Last Modified: Fri Jul 29 2016 09:10:20.

 

 



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