Sergiev Posad (cmrs)

Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
On The Way
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
On The Way
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
On The Way
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
On The Way
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
On The Way
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
On The Way
      
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
On The Way
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
On The Way
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
On The Way
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
On The Way
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
On The Way
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
      
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
St. Sergius
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
St. Sergius
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
St. Sergius
      
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
Saturday Market
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
Gipsy Entertainers
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius
Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius

 

Sergiev Posad, Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius

Image/s: circa 2006  Accesses: 315

 

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The Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius is the spiritual center of the Russian Orthodox Church.  The monastery is situated in the town of Sergiev Posad.  The monastery was founded in 1345 by one of the venerated Russian saint Sergius of Radonezh, who built a wooden church in honor of the Holy Trinity on Makovets Hill.  St. Sergius supported Dmitri Donskoi in his struggle against the Tatars and sent two of his monks to participate in the Battle of Kulikovo (1380).  The monastery was devastated by fire, when a Tatar unit raided the area in 1408.  St. Sergius was declared patron saint of the Russian state in 1422.  The same year the first stone cathedral was built by a team of Serbian monks who had found refuge in the monastery after the Battle of Kosovo.  The relics of St. Sergius still may be seen in this cathedral, dedicated to the Holy Trinity.  Traditionally, Muscovite royals were baptized in this cathedral and held thanksgiving services here.  In 1476, Ivan III invited several Pskovian masters to build the church of the Holy Ghost.  This graceful structure is one of the few remaining examples of a Russian church topped with a bell tower.  The interior contains the earliest specimens of glazed tiles used for decoration.  In the early 16th century, Vasily III added the Nikon annex and the Serapion tent.  It took 26 years to construct the six-pillared Assumption Cathedral, which was commissioned by Ivan the Terrible in 1559.  The cathedral is much larger than its model and namesake in the Moscow Kremlin.  The magnificent iconostasis of the 16th–18th centuries features Simon Ushakov's masterpiece, the icon of Last Supper.  Interior walls were painted with violet and blue frescoes by a team of Yaroslavl masters in 1684.  The vault contains burials of Boris Godunov, his family and several 20th century patriarchs.  As the monastery grew into one of the wealthiest landowners in Russia, the woods where it had stood were cut over and a village (or posad) sprang up near the monastery walls.  It gradually developed into the modern town of Sergiyev Posad.  In 1550s, a wooden palisade surrounding the cloister was replaced with 1.5 km-long stone walls, featuring twelve towers, which helped the monastery to withstand a celebrated 16-month Polish-Lithuanian siege in 1608–1610.  A shell-hole in the cathedral gates is preserved as a reminder of Wladyslaw IV's abortive siege in 1618.  By the end of the 17th century, when young Peter I twice found refuge within the monastery from his enemies, numerous buildings had been added.  These include a small baroque palace of the patriarchs and a royal palace, with its facades painted in checkerboard design.  The five-domed Church of John the Baptist's Nativity (1693–1699) was commissioned by the Stroganovs and built over one of the gates.  Other 17th century structures include the monks' cells, a hospital topped with a tented church, and a chapel built over a holy well discovered in 1644.  In 1744, Empress Elizabeth conferred on the cloister the dignity of the Lavra.  Another pledge of Elizabeth's affection for the monastery is a white-and-blue baroque bell tower.  Throughout the 19th century, the Lavra maintained its status as the richest Russian monastery.  A seminary founded in 1742 was replaced by an ecclesiastical academy in 1814.  The monastery boasted a supreme collection of manuscripts and books.  After the Russian Revolution the Soviet government closed the Lavra in 1920.  Its buildings were assigned to different civic institutions or declared museums.  In 1930, monastery bells, including the Tsar-Bell of 65 tons, were destroyed.  Many valuables were lost or transferred to other collections.  In 1945, following Joseph Stalin's temporary tolerance of the church during World War II, the Lavra was returned to the Russian Orthodox Church.  On April 16, 1946 divine service was renewed at the Assumption Cathedral.  The lavra continued as the seat of Moscow Patriarchy until 1983, when the patriarch was allowed to settle at the Danilov Monastery in Moscow.  The monastery continues as a prime center of religious education.

Reference/s: Wikipedia

Identifier: 149, Last Accessed: 2017-09-23 09:32:40

 

Copyright: © A. O. Newberry & Co. 2007-2017
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Last Modified: Fri Jul 29 2016 09:10:20.

 

 



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