Sergius and Bacchus (crs)

Sergius and Bacchus
Sergius and Bacchus
Sergius and Bacchus
Sergius and Bacchus
Sergius and Bacchus
Minbar
Sergius and Bacchus
      
Sergius and Bacchus
Mihrab
Sergius and Bacchus
Mihrab
Sergius and Bacchus

 

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According to later legend, during the reign of Justin I, his nephew Justinian had been accused of plotting against the throne and was sentenced to death.  However, in a dream, the saints Sergius and Bacchus appeared before Justin and vouched for Justinian’s innocence.  He was freed and restored to his title of Caesar, and in gratitude vowed that he would dedicate a church to the saints once he became emperor.  The construction of this Church of Saints Sergius and Bacchus, between 527 and 536 AD, was one of the first acts of the reign of Justinian I.  The location that was chosen for the new church was an irregular area between the Palace of Hormisdas (the house of Justinian before his accession to the throne) and the Church of the Saints Peter and Paul.  Back then, the two churches shared the same narthex, atrium and propylaea.  The new church became the center of the complex, and part still survives today.  The church was one of the most important religious structures in Constantinople.  Shortly after the building of the church a monastery bearing the same name was built near the edifice.  During the years 536 and 537, the Palace of Hormisdas became a Monophysite monastery, where followers of that sect, coming from the eastern regions of the Empire and escaping the persecutions against them, found protection by Empress Theodora.  In year 551 Pope Vigilius, who some years before had been summoned to Constantinople by Justinian, found refuge in the church from the soldiers of the Emperor who wanted to capture him.  After the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453, the church remained untouched until the reign of Bayezid II.  Then (between 1506 and 1513) it was transformed into a mosque by Hüseyin Ağa, the chief of the Aghas, (Black Eunuchs) who were the custodians of the Bab-ı-Saadet in the Sultan's residence, the famous Topkapı Palace.  At that time the portico and madrasah were added to the building.  In 1740 the Grand Vizier Hacı Ahmet Paşa restored the mosque and built the Şadırvan (fountain).  Damage caused by the earthquakes of 1648 and 1763 were repaired in 1831 under the reign of Sultan Mahmud II.  In 1762 the minaret was first built.  It was demolished in 1940 and built again in 1956.  The pace of decay of the building, which already suffered because of humidity and earthquakes through the centuries, accelerated after the construction of the railroad.  The laying down of the railroad caused parts of St. Peter and Paul to be demolished to the south of the building.  Other damage was caused by the building's use as housing for the refugees during the Balkan Wars.  My pictures are from before the restoration.

Reference/s: Wikipedia

Identifier: 135, Last Accessed: 2017-07-15 14:18:44

 

Copyright: © A. O. Newberry & Co. 2007-2017
All rights reserved.

Last Modified: Fri Jul 29 2016 09:10:20.

 

 



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