Chora (crs)

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The Chora Church was originally built outside the walls of Constantinople.  Literally translated, the church's full name was the Church of the Holy Saviour in the Country.  The last part of that name, Chora, referring to its location originally outside of the walls, became the shortened name of the church.  The original church on this site was built in the early 5th century, and stood outside of the 4th century walls of Constantine the Great.  However, when Theodosius II built his formidable land walls in 413–414, the church became incorporated within the city's defences, but retained the name Chora.  The majority of the fabric of the current building dates from 1077–1081, when Maria Dukaina, the mother-in-law of Alexius I Comnenus, rebuilt the Chora Church as an inscribed cross: a popular architectural style of the time.  Early in the 12th century, the church suffered a partial collapse.  The church was rebuilt by Isaac Comnenus, Alexius's third son.  However, it was only after the third phase of building, two centuries later, that the church as it stands today was completed.  The powerful Byzantine statesman Theodore Metochites endowed the church with much of its fine mosaics and frescos.  Theodore's impressive decoration of the interior was carried out between 1315 and 1321.  The mosaic-work is the finest example of the Palaeologian Renaissance.  The artists remain unknown.  Around fifty years after the fall of the city to the Ottomans, Atık Ali Paşa, the Grand Vizier of Sultan Bayezid II, ordered the Chora Church to be converted into a mosque — Kariye Camii.  Due to the prohibition against iconic images in Islam, the mosaics and frescoes were covered behind a layer of plaster or were otherwise defaced.  This and frequent earthquakes in the region have taken their toll on the artwork.  In 1948, Thomas Whittemore and Paul A. Underwood, from the Byzantine Institute of America and the Dumbarton Oaks Center for Byzantine Studies, sponsored a program of restoration.  From that time on, the building ceased to be a functioning mosque.  In 1958, it was opened to the public as a museum — Kariye Müzesi.

Reference/s: Wikipedia

Identifier: 129, Last Accessed: 2017-11-07 17:42:32

 

Copyright: © A. O. Newberry & Co. 2007-2017
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Last Modified: Fri Jul 29 2016 09:10:20.

 

 



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