Perge (cmrs)

Perge
Perge, Walk
Perge
Perge, City Walls
Perge, Into the Ruins
Perge
Perge, Roman Gate
Perge, Hellenistic Gate in the Background
Perge, Roman Gate
Perge, Hellenistic Gate in the Background
Perge, Roman Gate
      
Perge
Perge, Roman Gate
Perge, Roman Gate looking out
Perge, Roman Gate
Perge
Perge, Roman Gate
Perge
Perge, Hellenistic Gate
Perge
Perge
      
Perge
Perge
Perge
Perge, Southern Baths
Perge
Perge, Agora
Perge
Perge
Perge, Hellenistic Gates
      
Perge
Perge, Hellenistic Gates
Perge
Perge, Hellenistic Gates
Perge
Traveling Companiona
Perge, Colonnaded Street in the Background
Perge, Hellenistic Gates
Perge
Perge, Hellenistic Gates
Perge
      
Perge
Perge, Southern Baths
Perge
Perge, Southern Baths
Perge
Perge, Southern Baths
Perge
Perge, Southern Baths
Perge
From the Southern Baths
Perge
Southern Baths
      
Perge
Southern Baths
Perge, City Walls
Southern Baths
Perge
Southern Baths
Perge
Stadium
Perge
Southern Baths
Perge
      
Perge
Lecture Time
Perge
Southern Baths
Perge
Southern Baths
Perge
Southern Baths
Perge
Through the Hellenistic Gates
Perge
Through the Hellenistic Gates
      
Perge
Hellenistic Gates
Perge
Agora
Perge
Perge
Agora
Perge
Colonnaded Street
Perge
Agora
      
Perge, From Inside the City
Hellenistic Gates
Perge, Roman Gates in the Background
Hellenistic Gates
Perge
Agora
Perge, Acropolis in the Background
Agora
Perge
Agora
Perge
Agora
      
Perge
Agora
Perge
Agora
Perge
Agora
Perge
Colonnaded Street
Perge
Nymphaeum
Perge
      

 

Accesses: 267

 

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Nn the twelfth century BC, there was a large wave of Greek migration from northern Anatolia to the Mediterranean coast.  Many settled in the area immediately east of the area of modern-day Antalya, which came to be known as Pamphylia, meaning "land of all tribes".  Four great cities eventually rose to prominence in Pamphylia: Perga, Sillyon, Aspendos and Side.  Perga itself was founded in around 1000 BC and is nearly 20km inland.  It was sited inland as a defensive measure in order to avoid the pirate bands that terrorized this stretch of the Mediterranean.  In 546 BC, the Achaemenid Persians defeated the local powers and gained control of the region.  Two hundred years later, in 333 BC, the armies of Alexander the Great arrived in Perga during his war of conquest against the Persians.  The citizens of Perga sent out guides to lead his army into the city.  Alexander's was followed by the diadoch empire of the Seleucids, under whom Perga's most celebrated ancient inhabitant, the mathematician Apollonius (c.262 BC – c.190 BC), lived and worked.  Apollonius was a pupil of Archimedes and wrote a series of eight books describing a family of curves known as conic sections, comprising the circle, ellipse, parabola and hyperbola.  Roman rule began in 188 BC, and most of the surviving ruins today date from this period.  After the collapse of the Roman Empire, Perga remained inhabited until Seljuk times, before being gradually abandoned.  Perga is today an archaeological site and a major tourist attraction.  Ancient Perge, one of the chief cities of Pamphylia, was situated between the Rivers Catarrhactes (Duden sou) and Cestrus (Ak sou), 60 stadia from the mouth of the latter; the site is in the modern Turkish village of Murtana on the Suridjik sou, a tributary of the Cestrus, formerly in the Ottoman vilayet of Koniah.  Its ruins include a theatre, a palæstra, a temple of Artemis and two churches.  The very famous temple of Artemis was located outside the town.  Tour guides tell the story that Perga is the birthplace of Beer, allegedly discovered by accident; but recent finds of Pharaonic beer predate the city by far.

Reference/s: Wikipedia

Identifier: 123, Last Accessed: 2017-07-25 11:21:33

 

Copyright: © A. O. Newberry & Co. 2007-2017
All rights reserved.

Last Modified: Fri Jul 29 2016 09:10:20.

 

 



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