Antalya (crs)

Konyaalti Beach
Konyaalti Beach
Martyrs Monument Overlooking Konyaalti Beach
Martyrs Monument
Martyrs Monument Overlooking Konyaalti Beach
Martyrs Monument
Konyaalti Cliffs Overlooking the Antalya Basin, Mediterranean
Konyaalti Cliffs
Konyaalti Cliffs Overlooking the Antalya Basin, Mediterranean
Konyaalti Cliffs
Modern Buildings Along the Konyaalti Cliffs
Modern Buildings
      
Konyaalti Beach
Konyaalti Beach
Kugulu Park
Kugulu Park
Kugulu Park
Kugulu Park
Kugulu Park
Kugulu Park
Kugulu Park
Kugulu Park
Kugulu Park
Kugulu Park
      
Lycian Tomb, Anatalya Museum
Lycian Tomb

The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum, Small Item Collection
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum, Small Item Collection
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum, Small Item Collection
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum, Small Item Collection
The Anatalya Museum
      
The Anatalya Museum, Small Item Collection
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum, Dancer
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum, Hadrian
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum, Trajan
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum, Plancia Magna
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum
      
The Antalya Museum, Hadrian
The Antalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum, Hermes
The Anatalya Museum
      
The Antalya Museum, Alexander the Great
The Antalya Museum
The Antalya Museum, Hall of the Sarcophagi
The Antalya Museum
The Antalya Museum, Hall of the Sarcophagi
The Antalya Museum
The Antalya Museum, Hall of the Sarcophagi
The Antalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum
The Antalya Museum, Hall of the Sarcophagi
The Antalya Museum
      
The Antalya Museum, Hall of the Sarcophagi
The Antalya Museum
The Antalya Museum, Hall of the Sarcophagi
The Antalya Museum
The Antalya Museum
The Antalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum, The Museum Garden
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum, The Museum Garden
The Anatalya Museum
      
The Anatalya Museum, The Museum Garden
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum, The Museum Garden, Theater Mask
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum, The Museum Garden, Theater Mask
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum, The Museum Garden, Theater Mask
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum, The Museum Garden, Theater Mask
The Anatalya Museum
The Anatalya Museum, The Museum Garden
The Anatalya Museum
      
Sillyon Hotel
Sillyon Hotel

 

Accesses: 237

 

Previous 
Side 
    Next
 Aphrodisias 
  Start Slide Show

Attalos II, king of Pergamon, was believed to have founded the city around 150 BC, naming it Attalia and selecting it as a naval base for his powerful fleet.nbsp; However, excavations in 2008 in the Doğu Garajı district of Antalya have uncovered remains dating to the 3rd century BC, suggesting that the city was founded earlier than previously supposed.  Antalya became part of the Roman Republic in 133 BC when King Attalos III of Pergamum willed his kingdom to Rome at his death.  The city grew and prospered during the Ancient Roman period. Christianity started to spread in the region after 2nd century.  Antalya was visited by Paul of Tarsus.  Antalya was a major city in the Byzantine Empire.  It was the capital of the Byzantine Theme of Carabisiani, which occupied the southern coasts of Asia Minor and the Aegean Islands.  At the time of the accession of John II Comnenus (1118) it was an isolated outpost against the Turks.  The following year, with the aid of his commander-in-chief John Axuch, John II drove the Turks from the land routes to Antalya and reconnected the city with the rest of the empire.  The city, along with the surrounding region, was conquered by the Seljuk Turks in the early 13th century.  Antalya was the capital of the Turkish beylik of Teke (1321-1423) until its conquest by the Ottomans.  In the 19th century, in common with most of Anatolia, its sovereign was a "dere bey" (land lord or landowner).  The records of the Levant (Turkey) Company, which maintained an agency in Antalya until 1825, documented the local dere beys.  In the 20th century the population of Antalya increased as Turks from the Caucasus and the Balkans moved into Anatolia.  By 1911 it was a city of about 25,000 people.  The port was served by coast steamers of local companies.  Antalya was picturesque, but ill-built and backward.  The chief attraction for visitors was the city wall.  The city was briefly occupied by the Italians from the end of the First World War until the founding of the Turkish Republic in 1923.

Unfortunately, we only had time for the museum in Antalya.  I only got a glimpse of Hadrian's Gate.  As you can see, the setting of Antalya is exceptional.

Reference/s: Wikipedia

Identifier: 110, Last Accessed: 2017-07-25 11:15:34

 

Copyright: © A. O. Newberry & Co. 2007-2017
All rights reserved.

Last Modified: Fri Jul 29 2016 09:10:20.

 

 



--------
Galleries
Turkey
--------
Change Log
Collections
Contact
Galleries
Help
Home
Introduction
Maps
References
Table of Contents
Technical Information