France (cs)

The Château d’Amboise and the chapel where Leonardo da Vinci is buried from the north bank of the
Amboise
Street marker leading to the Tapestry of Bayeux
Bayeux
Château de Beynac
Beynac-et-Cazenac
Valentré Bridge
Cahors
Carcassonne
Carcassonne
Château d'Azay-le-Rideau
Azay-le-Rideau
      
Château de Castel Novel
Château de Castel Novel
Château de Chambord
Château de Chambord
Château de Chenonceau with the donjon in the foreground and the castle proper over the Cher
Château de Chenonceau
Château de Fontainebleau
Château de Fontainebleau
Château de Hautefort
Château de Hautefort
Château de Loose
Château de Loose
      
The cathedral of Notre-Dame de Chartres from the Eure river valley
Chartres
Chateau de Castelnaud-la-Chapelle
Castelnaud-la-Chapelle
Romanesque Church of Saint-Pierre
Collonges la Rouge
L'eglise Notre-Dame et Saint-Jean-Baptiste
Condat-sur-Vézère
Country Views
Country Views
Longues Artillery Battery
D-Day Beaches
      
The Belvedere de la Barre
Domme
The Water Lilly Pond
Giverny
France
Manoir d'Hautegente
Place des Consuls and the Hotel de la Raymondie
Martel
Mont Saint-Michel
Mont Saint-Michel
Ile de la Cite
Paris
      
Cave paintings as depicted in the museum
Pech Merle
Outer Harbor at low tide
Port-en-Bressin
Rocamadour
Rocamadour
Place de la Liberte
Sarlat-la-Canéda
The 15th century church and a bit of the town
Saint-Cirq Lapopie
Fort National, 1689
St Malo
      
Eglise of Notre Dame de l'Assomption
Sainte-Mère-Église
The Vézère river reflecting a little of the town
Terrasson-Lavilledieu
Plaque at the entrance of Maison Pic, Les Grandes Tables du Monde
Valence
The entrance, early in the morning.
Vaux le Vicomte

 

Image/s: circa 1998 - 2006  Accesses: 946

 

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The borders of modern France are approximately the same as those of ancient Gaul.  Gaul was conquered by Julius Caesar in the 1st century BC.  Christianity first appeared in the 2nd and 3rd centuries and became firmly established by the 4th and 5th centuries.  France's existence as a separate entity began with the Treaty of Verdun in 843 when Charlemagne's empire was divided into East Francia, Middle Francia and Western Francia.  Western Francia approximated the area occupied by modern France.  The Carolingian dynasty ruled France until 987, when Hugh Capet, Duke of France and Count of Paris, was crowned King of France.  His descendants progressively unified the country through a series of wars and dynastic inheritance.  In 1209 the Cathars and the independence of southern France were eliminated.  The monarchy reached its height during the 17th century and the reign of Louis XIV.  Much of the Enlightenment occurred in French intellectual circles.  The monarchy ruled France until the French Revolution in 1789.  Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette were executed in 1793, along with thousands of other French citizens during the Reign of Terror.  After a series of short-lived governments, Napoleon Bonaparte seized control of the Republic in 1799, making himself First Consul, and later Emperor of what is now known as the First Empire (1804–1814).  Following Napoleon's final defeat in 1815, the French monarchy was re-established, but with constitutional limitations.  In 1830, a civil uprising established the July Monarchy, which lasted until 1848. The short-lived second Republic ended in 1852 when Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte proclaimed the Second Empire.  Louis-Napoleon was unseated following defeat in the Franco-Prussian war of 1870 and his regime was replaced by the Third Republic.

Identifier: 10, Last Accessed: 2017-09-23 09:16:16

 

Copyright: © A. O. Newberry & Co. 2007-2017
All rights reserved.

Last Modified: Fri Jul 29 2016 09:10:20.

 

 



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